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Pharmacy Future Leaders: Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPE) Part 1

Participants: Geily Ward, Joanne Pauyo, Jamie Kooiker, Luis Urbina * Today we begin our two part segment on Introductory Pharmacy […]

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May 17, 2018 Pharmacy Students, The Pharmacist Life

Participants: Geily Ward, Joanne Pauyo, Jamie Kooiker, Luis Urbina

* Today we begin our two part segment on Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPE). Part I will cover community pharmacy while part II will cover hospital pharmacy. 

  • Ranking sites
  • Jamie
    • Looked for atypical sites, sites that specialized in something or offered a little more than normal retail
    • I.e. compounding, independent pharmacy
  • Geily
  • Interrogate upperclassmen
  • Wish there was a site to anonymously rank rotation sites
  • There should be a sheet that outlines what the rotation will entail (projects, work environment, duties etc)
  • Joanne
    • Rank sites based on your interests, but also keep the door open to discover new opportunities. If you are not an animal person, then you probably shouldn’t choose a rotation at veterenary.
    • You don’t know whether you will like or love something unless you try it.
    • Story about clinical pharmacy
    • Negatives: requirements for the categories during APPE
  • First impressions
  • Jamie
    • Be honest with what you know, don’t stretch the truth otherwise you’ll be stuck when it comes time to prove it
  • Geily
  • “If you’re on time, you’re late!”
  • Dress to impress, personal hygiene is a thing!
  • Please Wash & IRON white coat!
  • Joanne
    • Sometimes first impressions are wrong. So, if you make a mistake by  stretching the truth or looking like a hot mess on the first day, own it and try to improve.
    • You are not going to be perfect. The purpose of rotations is to gain professional experience and skills.
    • Give yourself and preceptor a second chance

Mistakes

  • Jamie
  • Geily
  • (I don’t have a personal experience but have advice a preceptor gave me, “if you don’t know the answer to the question don’t guess, let them know you will research and get back to them promptly with a response… and do it!”
  • Joanne
    • I’ve made so many mistakes that I don’t know where to start. Mistakes are inevitable. (picking the wrong medication SALA,
    • Be honest and take responsibility
  • Costumers/Patients stories (belligerent, fake prescriptions)
  • Jamie
    • First patient I ever counseled starting crying uncontrollably when I told her we could not fill her oxy script early. Panicked and said “
  • Geily
  • Rude customers and how to deal
  • 16 year old oxycodone story (record not on E-FORSCE)
  • Learning the breath for 10 rule
  • Joanne
    • Similar story to Jaimie, where customer got upset when his opioid could not be filled
    • He actually went to several different pharmacies who previously told him the same thing
    • Most of the problems come from a lack of understanding about pharmacy
  • Speaking up
  • Jamie
    • If you see something going on and you want to be part of it, ask for permission. Make your interests known in order to get that bang for your buck during rotations
    • I.e. I was super interested in compounding but my preceptor had no idea until I expressed my desire to do it one day
    • While it’s important to let your preceptor guide you, don’t be afraid to let them know what you’re hoping to get out of the experience
  • Geily
  • Be professional about it but express your concerns to your preceptor, if nothing changes then speak to the experentials faculty at your school
  • Take a chance! (follow up on jamie’s story of asking for a new position)

 

  • Joanne
    • Choose your words carefully and be aware of your nonverbal communication
    • In Jaimie’s case, “I am very interested in compounding. Would it be okay if i gained some more experience here” vs. “I haven’t done any compounding since I’ve gotten here. (may be perceived as you are not happy at the site)

 

  • Unpleasant preceptors

 

  • Jamie
    • Even if your preceptor is not the best, remember to still be respectful and project a positive attitude. When you start to put that person in a box and label them as “rude” or “demanding,” and that’s how you treat them going forward and it might just become a self-fulfilling prophecy and will hinder any sort of professional relationship going forward
  • Geily
  • Always remember that every interaction is a job interview
  • No matter what the experience (positive or negative) you will learn a lesson
  • Pharmacy is a small world so be the bigger person (unless you’re being mistreated, then speak to experentials faculty at school)
  • Joanne (might have mult preceptors)

Politically correct answer

    • Reflect/Correct “Am I doing something wrong or is there some behavior that is causing the preceptor’s attitude”
    • Hour- break , but you take an hour and half break
  • Talk to the preceptor: “if there anything that I can do better?”
    • Constructive critiscism- take it and learn from it
    • If the preceptor says everything is great, then take them at their word and do what the other hosts said be respectful
  • Make the best out of the situation
    • There are really great preceptors who are dedicated to mentoring and teaching students, so don’t let one bad rotation or preceptor ruin your other rotations

Even if you do everything perfect and you are an angel, some ppl are just not going to like you (for their own personal reasons)

  • You can only control yourself.
  • My first rule is alway: reflect and correct
  • Speak to ppl that you trust to tell u the truth (not yes ppl).
    • Takes two
  • Follow what Geily & Jaimie said
  • But also take care of yourself
    • Don’t let this preceptor’s behavior define you. Just because he or she doesn’t like you does not mean you are going to be a horrible pharmacist. It doesnt mean you are not going to get hired when you graduate
    • Have an outlet to release the negativity through exericising, journaling, or art
    • Geily made a good point that the pharmacy world is small and you don’t want ppl saying bad things about you
      • But I’ve learned recently that some ppl are going to talk about you no matter what you do
      • If its constructive critiscism or true, then it is none of your business
      • One pharmacist told me that “let your work speak for itself.”
  • First impressions

 

  • Jamie
    • Project that “eagerness to learn” right from the start, if you seem disinterested and bored coming in, chances are likely your preceptor will pick up on it
    • Bring something to take notes with, it helped me remember things that I could mention later
  • Geily
  • If you stand out, they will remember you
  • Be early and prepared
  • Do a little digging, find things out about your place of rotation, so when conversations start you can let them know you are prepared
  • Do a lot of listening, and even though your mom thinks you’re the smartest person on the planet, everyone you meet will teach you something new… take it in!
  • Joanne

 

  • Costumers/Patients stories (nice, counseling)

 

  • JAmie
    • From simple to complex, every encounter really motivated and inspired me
  • Geily
  • Forming relationships with patients is what makes retail pharmacy worth it
  • Patients want to feel like more than just a number
  • Practice listening, not hearing, but truly listening to the patients needs
  • Counseling patient experience
  • Joanne

 

  • Great preceptors

 

  • Jamie
  • Geily
  • Let them know at the end what you enjoyed on the rotation
  • Express gratitude for their time and how you hope to work with them again in the near future
  • Leaving doors open is always a great idea
  • Joanne
    • Form relationships
    • Maybe the preceptor can be a mentor for u and advise you and share their experiences
    • It is better to save time and  learn from another’s failure

Geily: “Than you Luis for a wonderful part 1 of the IPPE segment, we hope you enjoyed our stories and tips as much as we enjoyed sharing them. Stay tuned as we continue this two part segment on ROTATIONS.”

 

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